White House LGBTQ Tech and Innovation Briefing

Last week I was invited to join over 300 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer tech leaders at the White House for the third annual LGBT Tech & Innovation Briefing. Together we discussed how technology can help address some of the nation’s biggest problems in criminal justice reform, environment, health, inclusion, entrepreneurship, youth solutions, and improving LGBT federal statistics.

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Open data from the U.S. Government fuels data-driven legislation and public services, but what if that data doesn’t include everyone? The lack of representation of marginalized communities affects our ability to accurately identify what issues need to be addressed.

I was part of the team working on criminal justice reform. The Police Data Initiative (PDI), encourages transparency in law enforcement to bring community trust and accountability. Launched last April, over 70 police jurisdictions have volunteered to release their data publicly – including Austin, Texas. Denice Ross, senior advisor at the White House and co-founder of PDI, shared how analyzing police data is difficult because it is not standardized. Ross encouraged us to engage with local police departments to gain insight into how technology is used and can be improved from within.

What if we could help enable a new culture of open data in law enforcement agencies where police collaborate with their tech counterparts in local government and the community to publicly release incident-level, structured, machine-readable data on policing? Source

Megan Smith, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, speaks on humanizing data
Megan Smith, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, speaks on humanizing data

Over the next couple of months, we will be using our experience at the briefing to plan for TechUP Inclusion + Innovation Week in November.